J. Kent Ltd.

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Play To Your Strong Suit

When you play to win in a card game, you use the cards in your strongest suit. When you play to win in business, you wear the strongest suit in your wardrobe. Custom clothing gives you the ability to design a suit that plays to your strengths and minimizes any irregularities in shape or proportion. You have the power to create exactly the image you desire, and can build your clothing to meet all your individual requirements, even if you are not proportioned like the average gentleman. Whether you're aiming for an approachable, casual suit, or a somber, more formal suit, custom clothing gives you the powerful image you need-because you always play to win....

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The Guide to Cufflinks

The T-bar is the most widely available type of cufflink. The hinged bar swings shut to let you push it through a buttonhole and then opens to keep the cufflink in place. It easy to put on and take off, and comes with just about any decoration imaginable. However, the decoration is only on one end of the cufflink, dressing only one side of your cuff. The fixed bar gives a decorative element on both ends of the cufflink, so your cufflink is dressy from any viewing angle. Because there are no moving parts, fixed bar cufflinks tend to be quite long lasting. Hold the larger end and press the smaller end through each buttonhole. The chain cufflink has two decorative elements connected by a chain instead of a solid bar. Grasp the smaller end and press it through each set of buttonholes one at a time. Once through, simply rotate it...

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Different Length Ties

I received this question from a reader: How do I tie different length ties right the first time? This is what I shared with them: We've got a simple way to help you know exactly where to start your knot, with any length of necktie. Tie your regular knot. Carefully untie and measure the length of fabric used in knot. Slide the thick (wide) end of your necktie down so that length of fabric used in the knot sits just below your belt buckle. Hold the necktie in position carefully and tie the knot again. QUICK TIP: Find an easy approximation of the knot fabric length (such as fingertip to fingertip of your outstretched hand, or two hand widths, etc.) and use that as your measurement each time instead of using a ruler....

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Types of Shirt Plackets

Designing your personal style means paying attention to details. Have you considered the style potential of choosing between the various options for shirt placket design? (That's the strip of fabric that holds the buttons.) Front placket-found in the vast majority of dress shirts. Always a good option for business attire, but its ubiquity means it lacks individuality. No front placket-also called a French front, this placket has no visual stitching alongside the row of buttons, so it creates clean lines but can be trickier to iron. Covered placket-commonly called a fly front, the covered placket has an additional layer of fabric covering the buttons. It's sometimes found in tuxedo shirts and other very dressy clothing. Tuxedo front-looks similar to the French front but differs in that the top four buttons are removable, allowing you to replace the buttons with tuxedo studs. This placket is best used only with tuxedo shirts. The...

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QUEUE UP FOR COOL BLUES

Blue is one of the most dependable colors for your custom clothing. Navy blazers and suit coats make your favorite white shirts look fantastically crisp. They're also great paired with shirts in pastels of any shade, or a soft gray. If you're looking to make a coat or full suit in a lighter shade of blue, consider a blue-gray tone for an elegant change of pace. Dress shirts made in a rich shade of blue are a perfect partner for tan or gray trousers or crisp jeans. Make sure the jeans and shirt are not so close in color that they compete visually. When dressing in blues, add in an accent piece for a splash of color, whether it's a tie, a pocket square, a tie clip, or cuff links....

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THE PROBLEM WITH SHOPPING SALES

It can be tempting to go to a clothing store and see what's on the sale racks. Saving money can be a satisfying experience-but what's the hidden cost of buying sale items? Store-bought clothing items that are on sale are often fad-inspired pieces that have faded in popularity or were produced in odd colors that the store had trouble selling. Generally, the store's sale items are not the classic pieces that will give you good service for years (if not decades). Consider the cost per wear, rather than the purchase price. An item that costs $500 that you wear twice a month for 5 years costs just over $4 for each time it's worn. Something that costs $100 saves you $400 in purchase price, but if you only wear it five times before relegating it to gather dust in the back of your closet, it costs you $20 each time it's...

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Odd Vests

There’s nothing odd about odd vests! The phrase simply refers to wearing a vest outside of a three-piece-suit ensemble—a great strategy for adding visual appeal and stretching your clothing budget by increasing the number of mix-and-match options in your wardrobe. Light-colored vests, such as sand or dove gray, look fantastic under a suit. You may choose to build your vest of the same material as your trousers or sport jacket, or instead select a coordinating fabric. The back of the vest is often constructed of thin lining fabrics to avoid adding bulk and heat. Wearing matching trousers and vest with a contrasting coat makes a striking ensemble. The vest should be long enough to cover your waistband. Braces are a good choice with a vest, as a belt will push the vest fabric away from your waist, creating the appearance of thickness. The armholes of your vest should be large, to allow...

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Buying Cheap = Buying Twice

We have all found ourselves tempted to purchase something because of a low price. However, if you buy something you don’t really need because it’s “a deal” or “on sale,” you may find that your impetuous purchase isn’t a good fit for you. Perhaps it’s a color you don’t really care for, or a seasonal fabric that you can’t wear often. It may end up being used only once or twice (or never), and then taking up space unnecessarily. Later on, when you replace that item with something more useful that actually contributes to your wardrobe options, you’ll find that having to make two purchases cancelled out the savings of buying something inexpensive. Instead of saving money, you’ll have bought twice. When buying clothing, you may also find that low prices can often mean low quality, including cheaper fabrics that wear out sooner, sloppy detailing, buttons that are not securely fastened, or...

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What’s So “Super” About Super Wools?

An age-old grading system is used to ensure that the quality of wool fabric is accurately categorized—and valued. The finest worsted wools are called “super wools” or “choice wool.” Carded wools are called “woolens.” When the grading system for worsted wool began in England, it applied only to 100% pure raw wool, but now covers wool blends that incorporate other natural fibers, such as cashmere, mohair, or alpaca.  While the USDA monitors wool grading in the U.S., The British Wool Textile Export Corporation introduced a code of practice concerning the description of wool quality in the 1990s to clear up confusion in the marketplace caused by companies describing the same qualities of wool in different ways. The main benefit to consumers is consistent rating of the quality of wool fiber contained in cloths woven in the United Kingdom.  For more than a century cloth woven in the United Kingdom has been...

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Raising the Bar: The Collar Pin

You already know that paying attention to your accessories sets you apart from the crowd. One accoutrement that quickly gives an air of elegance to an ensemble is a collar pin. This refined tool gives the knot in your tie more visual importance and stability. It’s perfect for days when you want to look your best—and want the confidence that comes from stylish dressing. Many notable gentlemen of style have been known to sport a collar pin, from Fred Astaire and Steve McQueen to Tom Ford and Daniel Craig. Its rarity is part of its appeal, as its use shows considerable sartorial savvy. If you enjoy the collar pin but prefer a less noticeable approach, put aside the more common safety pin style and try the barbell style. Whichever collar pin you prefer, make sure to pair it with a substantial tie knot for best effect....

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